Sculpture in the Harbour 2014
Photo courtesy of Barbara Madden © 2014

Sculpture in the Harbour 2014 "Reflections"

2014's exhibition was planned to coincide with Albany’s extremely successful WW1 ANZAC Commemoration. As such, a theme of 'Reflections' was prescribed so that in the design and construction of their works, the fifteen artists reflected on aspects of the First World War. It is estimated that in excess of 10,000 visitors viewed the artworks.

Select sculpture by choosing a thumbnail below

They didn’t come back At the Going Down of the Sun F.E.A.L.T.Y  [Finest Export Antipodean Lamb To Ypres] Hope The Anzac fleet from King George Sound – Marching Soldiers The Anzac fleet from King George Sound – Ship of Stories War Games Orpheus, in Transit The Signal for ‘U’ Dear Mother Victory Angel The AE2 is scuttled Excavated Memories Crux Crux

 

They Didn't Come Back by Anne Grotian

They Didn't Come Back They Didn't Come Back (detail) They Didn't Come Back (horses before installation)
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Stoneware clay, Sinterengobe, metal, wood and wire.

10,000 horses from Australia and New Zealand left for World War 1. Many farmers and pastoralists from the South West supplied horses for the war effort. None of the horses came back. If they survived, they got shot. An estimated 8 million horses were killed during the First World War.

I chose horses as a metaphor for the dirty death in war. The white horses symbolise the beauty of youth and life, whilst the coloured horses are suffering and death.

Other Sculptures by Anne Grotian

Caryatide and Amphora
Caryatide and Amphora

At the Going Down of the Sun by Tony Jones

At the Going Down of the Sun At the Going Down of the Sun (as the sun goes down) At the Going Down of the Sun (detail)
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Steel construction

My sculpture is an adaption of a Harbour Navigation Marker.

As the ships left Albany on their sad journey, these would have guided them from the harbour to whatever fate awaited.

The marker in this case makes reference to the rising sun symbol.

I think of this as a setting sun. "At the going down of the sun…"

Other Sculptures by Tony Jones

Point Resolution
Point Resolution

F.E.A.L.T.Y [ Finest Export Antipodean Lamb To Ypres] by Duncan Moon

F.E.A.L.T.Y  [ Finest Export Antipodean Lamb To Ypres] F.E.A.L.T.Y  [ Finest Export Antipodean Lamb To Ypres] (detail) F.E.A.L.T.Y  [ Finest Export Antipodean Lamb To Ypres] (detail)
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Form ply, filler, aluminium bracket, acrylic paint

A family brawl among the dynastic, intermarried royal houses of Europe required the lives of millions to ultimately leave the matter unresolved. An over-bearing parent kingdom demanded the loyal allegiance of its teenaged progeny. With fealties sworn, the dutiful young countries gave up to their mother a generation of their finest for the cause of futility.

‘Lambs to the slaughter’ - the clichéd metaphor to describe the wanton despatch of troops in the theatre of war- still effectively describes the holocaust wrought by the new technologies of industrialised warfare on the frail human figure, butchered like never before.

The symmetrically reflected lamb chop image forms a heart shape to remind us that the meat that fed the war machine was someone’s loved one – a person, not merely a number or a name to be placed on a cross. The repetition of the lamb chop image within the form gives a sense of the multitude needed to fulfil the nightmarish vision of those who held power. This work reflects on the price of loyalty in asymmetric relationships and the obscenity that is war.

Hope by David Stockdale

Hope Hope (detail) Hope (during installation)
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Marine ply and timber with bronze patina

The figure is standing tall and proud and strong holding a child who looks to the future with hope and joy and safety.

The Cubist style of this sculpture comes out of the collective fractured consciousness of humanity after the world wars. The aged bronze patina implies the hard fought past of this fartherly figure. His sacrifices, pain and loss have given him an inner strength, posture and even hope for the present and the future. All that is to look forward to in life, in the world is in existence because of, or even out of, past sacrifices and wisdom.

The child is representing all that exists now. The two together in this sculpture hold a moment in a dynamic flow between past and present and future. This is a gesture of reflectiveness and understanding, from the past moving in the present moment toward a positive hopeful future.

Other Sculptures by David Stockdale

Hope by David Stockdale
Joy

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers by Tony Pankiw

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers (detail) The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers (during installation)
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Construction was completed in Tony Pankiw’s studio in Perth. Each Marching Soldier is 2.4 metres high, 500mm wide and constructed from 6mm aluminum plate.

Tony Pankiw has designed and created artworks that honour the human element of the departing Anzacs. These two ‘Marching Soldiers’ are Alfred and Gareth in tribute to the passage they all took – from Albany to Gallipoli.

During the research process undertaken by Tony and Sue Codee for another sculpture in this exhibition, ‘Ship of Stories’, photo-graphic images of marching soldiers along York Street inspired these sculptures.

The two Marching Soldiers, Alfred and Gareth, are of differing sizes and dimensions, giving them individuality. They are stylised and reflect the look of the Anzacs in a marching pose with their slouch hat and the standard issue rifles with bayonets attached.

Other Sculptures by Tony Pankiw

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories
The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories by Tony Pankiw & Sue Codee

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories (detail) The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Ship of Stories (with artists Sue Codee & Tony Pankiw)
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After a collaborative design process between Tony and Sue, construction was completed in Tony’s studio in Perth. Ship of Stories is constructed from 6mm aluminium plate.

Tony Pankiw’s extensive experience creating public art projects and local Albany artist Sue Codee’s unique intricate design skills have led to the artwork, ‘Ship of Stories’.

‘Ship of Stories’ tells the tale of the troop ships that left King George Sound in 1914, and all who were aboard. Many people would not be aware that a multitude of horses were transported from Albany with the Anzac fleet. Our research of historical data has uncovered the enormous cargo that the Anzac fleets carried with one archival photograph of an Anzac in Egypt hand feeding a kangaroo.

On the side of the ships are cut out images relating to the Anzacs and where they have come from within Western Australia, New Zealand and the rest of Australia. The depictions on ‘Ship of Stories’ include kangaroos and kiwis representing the Australian and New Zealand contingents, along with references to the soldiers’ lives before joining the armed forces.

Other Sculptures by Tony Pankiw

The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers
The ANZAC Fleet from King George Sound - Marching Soldiers

War Games by Sandy O'Doherty

War Games War Games (detail, boy and boat) War Games (detail, girl with doll)
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Cement Fondue over a metal armature

The old game through generations… life and death played out and repeated. You’re dead. No it’s your turn. I died last time. But it’s only a game and it does not matter if a gun is given when there are sticks on the ground. They make good weapons. You can’t play. You’re a girl. Play with your dolls instead. The soldiers fight on, and the nurse picks up the pieces.

Other Sculptures by Sandy O'Doherty

Incoming Tide
Incoming Tide
‘Grateful I am that I was born here’
‘Grateful I am that I was born here’

Orpheus, in Transit by Stuart Elliott

Orpheus, in Transit Orpheus, in Transit (sunset silhouette) Orpheus, in Transit (detail)
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Welded steel, aluminium, acrylic plate, oil, epoxy and bitumous based industrial paints, mild steel nuts and bolts.

Certainty dissolved like sea mist

before their iron bows.

The Hydra, Sirens and Gaia

were this time well prepared.

Other Sculptures by Stuart Elliott

Knut in Abdication
Knut in Abdication

THE SIGNAL for 'U' by John Farrington

THE SIGNAL for 'U' THE SIGNAL for 'U' (detail) THE SIGNAL for 'U' (during installation)
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Sculpture constructed from welded steel tube skeleton, wire mesh reinforced rigid foam, sheet metal, finished with reinforced epoxy resins.

THE SIGNAL for ‘U’
A simple graphic expression of the human form sending the semaphore signal for ‘U’

Your COUNTRY needs ‘U’.
The EMPIRE needs ‘U’.

Are ‘U’ ready?
‘U’ are ready to depart.
What do ‘U’ think?

Other Sculptures by John Farrington

Diva Diver
Diva Diver
Flag the Vessels
FLAG the VESSELS

Dear Mother by Michael O'Doherty

Dear Mother Dear Mother (detail) Dear Mother (detail)
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Wood, polystyrene, lights, perspex

My Dear Mother,
Once again I have been through the thick of it and have come off without a single wound. No doubt you will hear about the fight we had and will probably know more that I could tell if I were permitted. I think I must have been very lucky. No doubt, I have been under heavy fire before, but not for so long or so exposed. We charged over a mile of grassy ground devoid of any cover. We had many casualties. Over half of us……… …………………………

Odysseus went through the lot with the same luck as me. Poor Achilles got it. Bad Luck. Tell his mother…….

Other Sculptures by Michael O'Doherty

Burning Down the House
Burning Down the House
Ex-caveat-ot
Ex-caveat-ot

Victory Angel by Lance Reid

Victory Angel Victory Angel (at sunset) Victory Angel (detail)
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Marine grade stainless steel.

Faceless and unseen by the departing boats, the Victory Angel was there, protecting all she could, reflecting light and hope to all on shore and visible on their return in the form of a medal.

At the landing, Robert’s ankle was shattered by enemy bullets. A gentle, quiet man, he had to suffer the agony for three days before a doctor could attend him.

But he was one of the lucky ones. He returned to become the loving grandfather of Jeff, Lucile, Ena, Robert, Karen, Yvonne, Cheryl, Wayne and Lance.

Thank you forever.

Other Sculptures by Lance Reid

It's a King Size Whiting by George
It's a King Size Whiting by George

The AE2 is Scuttled by Dave Taylor

The AE2 is Scuttled (at low tide) The AE2 is Scuttled (submerged) The AE2 is Scuttled (detail)
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Scaled replica of the AE2 submarine, steel construction.

I have always been interested in the story of our first submarines, the AE1 and the AE2.

The AE1 was lost with all hands in mysterious circumstances off Rabaul in September of 1914.

The AE2 left Albany with the ANZAC fleet and was the first allied vessel to successfully negotiate the treacherous Dardanelles straights on the morning of the Gallipoli landings. It entered the Sea of Marmora where it spent five days ‘running amok’ disrupting Turkish shipping and supply to the Gallipoli peninsula.

Losing control after technical difficulties, the sub came to the surface and was attacked by a torpedo boat and holed in the stern. The Captain, Commander Stoker decided not to let this cutting edge technology fall into the hands of the enemy so she was scuttled. The crew abandoned ship and were all picked up by the Turkish torpedo boat.

As she was going down by the bow the Captain, observing the last men jumping into the sea off the stern said “Curious incidents impress one at such times. As those last six men took to the water, the neat dive of one of the engine-room ratings will remain pictured in my mind forever.”

This is the moment I have attempted to capture.

Other Sculptures by Dave Taylor

Breach
Breach
U.F.O. (Unidentified Fishing Object)
U.F.O. (Unidentified Fishing Object)

Excavated Memories by Nic Compton

Excavated Memories Excavated Memories (low tide) Excavated Memories (detail)
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Pine and Paint

Part of my own New Zealand Maori heritage comes from a culture where remains of ancestors often held pride and place in the home. This work excavates the physical and can be seen as a metaphor for the memory of the 60,000 odd Australian’s slaughtered.

John McCrae’s “In Flanders Field” and Moina Belle Michael’s poem in response have made the rich red poppy an international symbol of those who became part of that disturbed soil of war.

My approach may be little heavier handed, yet my work has been undertaken with great respect.

Other Sculptures by Nic Compton

That Was the River; This is the Sea
That Was the River; This is the Sea
The Host
The Host

Crux by Sandy McKendrick

Crux Crux Crux (detail)
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Beach debris sourced from the shores of WA, the Cocos Keeling Islands - which was the site of the sinking of the Emden - and from Christmas Island. Materials include thong rubber, rubber matting, ropes, floats, buoys and recycled items.

Whether, from the flotilla of ships, you were looking onto the black ocean surface or into the night sky, the image of Crux - the Southern Cross - would have been visible to all aboard as they headed away from Western Australia.

Many symbols inspired this work but I continually returned to the cosmic representation of this constellation. The illumination of the stars: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta Cruces and Epsilon Cruces remain deeply embedded whenever I travel from home, just as I imagine it could have been for those who headed north in the ANZAC flotillas.

The flotsam and jetsam crafted into this artwork have already made epic journeys on oceanic currents prior to resting briefly on the sandy shores and coral atolls where they were collected.

Divided by James McLean

Divided Divided (a different view) Divided (detail)
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Concrete, coloured ochre, timber, metal .

When humanity chooses separation
over unity,
darkness follows...

Other Sculptures by James McLean

Turbines or Toilet
Turbines or Toilet
Blood Vessel
Blood Vessel